Protesting

I know a lot of people who will be at protest marches tomorrow in several countries and many cities… and I wanted to pass on a few articles that I thought had advice worth considering for a safe and comfortable march!

What to wear to a protest march (Particularly useful for 1st timers, I’d think!)

and

Texting without Cell ServiceTexting without Cell ServiceĀ (Because predictions are that at larger marches, the cell signal could get overloaded quickly.)

I know there are lots of other great resources out there too about how to stay safe, stay dry, and stay organised… please link below if you’ve read anything useful! I’d love to know too – are you marching? You’ll be in my thoughts as I (much less radically) visit my in-laws for our much-delayed Christmas celebrations!)


54 thoughts on “Protesting

    1. I hope it’s a positive, safe and empowering experience! I’m so impressed with how many people from all walks of life are standing up for their rights and views tomorrow! (On both sides, of course!)

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Your responses to the couple of negative comments are honest, kind and no-bullshit at the same time. Way to keep it classy lady! (I am thinking of joining a local protest here in Norway – it probably won’t be anywhere near the numbers they are seeing in the US, but definitely worthwhile)

        Liked by 3 people

        1. I”m rather baffled at people who are so easily upset by anyone even hinting at politics! Are they so afraid of rational, calm free speech? (Hell, I”m not even American, so what does it matter what I think?) Hope you have a good day tomorrow!

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      1. Absolutely – and as the wife of a ardently feminist man, and daughter of a mom and dad who will be marching tomorrow, I can’t fathom why ANYONE wouldn’t support women’s rights!

        Liked by 1 person

    1. It’s such a tense time for everyone on all sides, worldwide – I figure anything that keeps thing peaceful, safe and positive is good! ;(

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      1. It’s such an uncertain time for so many people – we’ve definitely got to stay informed and support each other, right? šŸ™‚

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    1. Hehehe – Can you imagine the reaction if I spoke about basic human rights (in my country, at least) like gay marriage, gender equality, the right to identify as whatever gender/non-binary identity you want, doctor-assisted death, or the rights of the immigrants and refugees I work with every day? This was me being polite!

      Liked by 3 people

  1. Hey Gillian, thanks for yet another thought-provoking and interesting post. I’d never heard of FireChat before, and am now totally enamoured of Wardrobe Oxygen! Thanks for the recommendation.
    As for politics, it’s your blog – you can write what you like. Well done on your dignified replies. Xx

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    1. Thank you! ā¤ I really like Wardrobe Oxygen… not sure when I started identifying with stylish 40 year olds as opposed to younger bloggers… but I admire her style, approach and work ethic!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Thanks so much for your post and the links. I was anxious about how to prep for tomorrow (I will be marching in San Jose, CA)! I feel embarrassed by my country’s new government but also hopeful that there are people the world over who feel similar things to me at this moment in history. And oh yeah, I also really appreciate the dignified way you stood up for yourself!!

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  3. Oh I giggled at the “I’m a city-dwelling Canadian…” quote. I’m an Australian living in the inner-city. Lots in common between us & not just sewing. Thanks for the link and intro to Wardrobe Oxygen.

    Hoping everyone marching is safe today.

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  4. I was just reading up on the March tonight as I wanted to be educated in what the March was all about. I found this on the “Women’s March on Washington” website – “Communities around the world will stand together in solidarity shoulder to shoulder for the protection of our human rights, our safety, our health, and our families. The strength of our cultures is essential to create vibrant, diverse and strong communities. We will rally together in solidarity, equality, diversity and inclusion. This day will be recognized as the International Day of Equality, Diversity and Inclusion.” Like I said, that is directly from the Women’s March website. I do not know how that could possibly offend anyone! I don’t consider it to be a “political” March but a reminder of how human rights, etc. are so important in this day and age. And if women (and/or men) are not allowed to walk together, gather, speak, etc. without out being ridiculed, shunned, shamed or hurt by anyone (male or female) then we have already lost the human right of free speech. I will get off my human rights soap box now. Thank you and Good Night! (Keep up the good blogging Gillian, no matter what your beliefs, politics, etc.)

    Liked by 2 people

    1. YES! How could anyone oppose all of that? I really believe that the marches yesterday were only partially about women’s right, but also, crucially, about the rights of all.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I am sad about Trump being POTUS and there are a load of protests going on in the UK but sadly I cannot go as I have to go help my Mum today. Have you seen the Pussyhat Project? I think that it is a smashing idea. I would love to knit one. Xx

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  6. Thanks for this post! I won’t be marching myself (I can’t risk spending a lot of time outdoors in the winter due to a history of pneumonia) but am definitely there in spirit. My sister and a group of her friends and colleagues are going to *the* march in DC and I am all at once very proud and very concerned for their safety. (The new president is incredibly hostile to any criticism of himself, not unlike some commenters here on this post!!) Thank you for sharing these resources–I will be bookmarking it for future protests because the resistance will continue and I’ll be out there as soon as winter ends! ā¤

    PS: I know you'd never stop posting your personal opinions here–thank goodness!–but I wanted to tell you how much it means to me that you are a proud and outspoken progressive woman. Thank you!

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    1. Oh dear! Pneumonia? THat’s nasty. Good choice to stay inside!
      I’ve been thinking a lot lately about the polite way that people avoid talking about their politics so that no feathers are ruffled. I’m feeling the need to be even more open about my views. I don’t care at all that people want to unfollow me, but I am actually upset that they’d been reading along thinking that I agree with them? On the other hand, there’s always that danger professionally of saying too much publicly that can bite you in the ass later, so I feel the need to be cautious,too. Ugh, complicated. But important, so I’m going to keep thinking about what to do.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I am marching in my small town of Traverse City, Michigan. Frankly, I’m a little nervous. But I will be with friends and be fine. The folks upset about mentioning politics fascinate me and this is THE question going forward – how do we talk to one another respectfully, learn from each other and find common ground in our communities – online and in-person? No clue what the answer is, but I want to make some headway on this.

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    1. It’s a tough balance, fighting injustice but also starting conversations. In teaching about bullying, we always tell kids, “Most of the time, if a bystander tells the bully to stop, it stops.” On a larger scale, I think that means we need to call out injustice each and every time. Somehow… not totally sure how!

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  8. Just popping in to show support for the marches across the globe and for you speaking about whatever you want on YOUR blog and wherever else you choose. I guess “those” commenters can do so too but … Really? Wtf. You weren’t even being controversial. Lol

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  9. Nice post! I’m baffled how anyone could be offended! And a bit terrified anyone could be so afraid of freedom of speech that this incites them šŸ˜ž I’ll be marching in Toronto!

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  10. Hi long time lurker but just wanted to comment that I marched in the Women’s March in Wellington, New Zealand. Time zones meant that the 4 marches in my country kicked off the global event. I have never participated in a protest march before and by the look of the crowd I was not alone.

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  11. Thank you Gillian! I joined the march yesterday in DC, and until I read your post, was woefully unprepared. The cell phone and metro card advice from the links were particularly helpful for my group. I also would like to point out to any other people who might have been offended, that you didn’t say anything political in your post at all – it was generic advice for anyone who might be attending a protest march, either the one yesterday or in the future, for or against whatever issue. But I’m glad you stood up for yourself – your blog, your rules!

    And a shout-out to Rebecca Davis – Traverse City is my home town! I live in Baltimore now, but still miss that little place. Michael Moore was a speaker at ours, and I wondered if there would be one in TC. Good for you for marching.

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    1. Oh, I’m so glad the advice was helpful! I would have no idea how to prep for a march that big, so I figured other people might not know either. How was DC? It must have been incredible to be right at the heart of it all!

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      1. DC was fantastic! A wonderful, positive yet strong vibe from sooooo many like-minded people. Made me proud, and hopeful for the first time since November. Now we just have to follow up with action. I certainly intend to. šŸ™‚

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