Cashmerette Webster in Crepe Knit

Cashmerette Clarement in Crepe Knit

It had to happen, right? The Cashmerette pattern that made me like wearing a woven was eventually going to be sewn in a knit. I mean, duh! Wovens are ok but knits are better!

Except this didn’t really turn out to be a winner – but that’s my fault for misjudging the fabric and forgetting how short my legs are!

Cashmerette Clarement in Crepe Knit

You see, the dress version just adds a shaped panel to the bottom of the tunic-length version I’d made before. The problem is that I have a normal-length torso atop teeny short legs! So whileย I actually wished the tunic was an inch or two longer, the dress version is way too long. The front hem is supposed to be straight and I curved it up instead – otherwise the whole front would be below the knee on me.

Cashmerette Clarement in Crepe Knit

Why not just rehem it? Well, I faced the whole back hem with self-fabric, so the white inside wouldn’t show! Which means it was hemmed before I attached it, and now all those layers are caught in the side seams. I’m open to advice for how to fix it – I could chop it to tunic length, or just cut off the back dipped hem and somehow try to rehem the two layers? Or cut off the side seams and rehem it as a minidress?

Cashmerette Clarement in Crepe Knit

For now though, this is how I styled it for work: grey Concord Cardigan, big scarf, leggings and boots. Which of course, covers up the design detail that sets Webster apart – the fun back!

Cashmerette Clarement in Crepe Knit

The problem is, I made a summer pattern in a winter weight fabric. At the time of year when this heavy poly crepe knit is appropriate and I want to wear this somber colours, I’m never going to be going sleeveless!

Cashmerette Clarement in Crepe Knit

Apart from that, the fabric was actually perfect as a substitution for a woven. It held the dart well, drapes nicely, and works with the all-in-one facing. I used fold-over elastic for the straps in the back, which saved me doing fiddly sewing and moves well with the knit. Too bad I didn’t chose the right bra to wear the day I took photos though – my other webster hides my bra just fine, so I blame the undergarment, not the dress!

(Oh, and I made the front neckline into a scoop, because the deep V always needed a cami underneath.)

Cashmerette Clarement in Crepe Knit

I know I don’t sound very thrilled with this dress… but I’m cutting it some slack because it was a relaxing and fun sewing project on the last day of summer vacation, when I was stressing about going to back to teaching. I always say that I love the process of sewing more than the finished product, and this is a perfect example!

I’m leaning toward cutting it off to tunic length – what do you think?


35 thoughts on “Cashmerette Webster in Crepe Knit

  1. I’m with you- it’s doing no favours, despite great colours. If you can’t face the shortening and refacing [see what I did there?] then hack it off. It will be worn more. The back could be shown off by wearing a contrasting T or turtleneck underneath?…just a thought, I like pinafore dress styling for just that reason.

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  2. I’m not sure if I have ever seen you wear skirts but you could always cut it off at the length that you ideally would have liked the hem and have a top and a skirt. You could keep the ‘dress’ look without the length issue.

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  3. I like the idea of cutting it off to be tunic length but I would be inclined to give it a bit of time to see if I would use it as is before making a change. Sometimes when projects don’t turn out as planned it takes some time for me to see them as what they are rather than as being not what I planned. Kind of like I like both chocolate cake and gingerbread. If I bite into one with the expectation that it is the other I will be disappointed because my expectation is not met where as the cake itself may be delicious it the expectation not being met is a bit of a disappointment.

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    1. Your cake/gingerbread analogy was so good! I read it twice when you posted it, and nodding along! Sewing projects do surprise me in the long run sometimes, and you are wise to suggest giving it some time!

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    1. That’s an interesting idea! I think the fabric might be too heavy for that… but I just did something similar with a top that was stretched out, so it’s a good suggestion!

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  4. I would probably hack off the bottom panel and rework it shorter, or go the tunic route. The hi-lo hem is fun, but youโ€™re right, a little too long. I hadnโ€™t realized we have the exact reverse proportions! ๐Ÿ˜‚ even though Iโ€™m 5โ€™7โ€ I have to petite bodices and then lengthen the bottom half. Good luck! I do think it would make a cute tunic.

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    1. Hehehe – If we sat next to each other, we’d probably be the same height! ๐Ÿ˜› I agree, it needs to get shorter somehow!!!

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  5. I am leaning toward mini-dress. Use the cut off length to add some sort of pockets on sort of the front upper thigh, if that makes sense…
    Would it work as a jumper with a thin long sleeve underneath…?

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  6. What about an elastic/tie at about the hip? Once on you could pull it up to the waist so the bodice blousens above the waist – like tucking in a blouse then pull it up a bit so it’s not super tight. That way you add shape, keep your hem and shorten all at the same time ๐Ÿ™‚ AND not so much work involved (bonus!) Such a pretty shape and colour on you!

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    1. I tried it with a belt, but the fabric is so heavy that it doesn’t blouse up much… but i wouldn’t never have through of your suggestion to cut it off at the waist and shorten it that way! Brilliant!

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  7. Or another thought – cut it off at the waist – remove the length and resew it as a seam at the waist – you could use some of your FOE that you used in the back at the waist when sewing the bodice and skirt back together.

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  8. Hmmm…Iโ€™m thinking maybe shorten to a tunic or mini-dress. And I tend to agree with the suggestions for a super thin-silhouette long sleeve t underneath. I have a Vogue pattern that actually is a similar concept; close-fit T-shirt and an overdress with a cross-cross back. I think itโ€™s a Marcy Tilton. Iโ€™ve only made the shirt (which is fine but my Renfrew still is better!) and the leggings but I love the concept!

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    1. Sounds like I need to try sewing a layering tee! I used to wear tees under sweater dresses all the time, but I haven’t tried it in a while! ๐Ÿ™‚

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  9. I love this and may have to steal the idea… though doing a facing with a knit sounds like a bit of a nightmare. I actually think it looks great without the cardigan on- which leads me to think its the length of the cardi and not the length of the dress that’s the issue. Do you have any super cropped cardis you can try it with? That would visually raise the waistline (since the dress doesn’t have one) and lengthen the legs, which sounds like what you are going for? I actually love the dress on you!

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    1. The facing was actually pretty easy… but this knit is quite stable. I wouldn’t like to try it in something stretchy! I think you are right about the length of the cardigan – I actually tried tying the grey cardi at the waist and thought it looked good until i turned to the side… but I forgot to photograph it like that!

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  10. I think the difference in the hemline is too much. Meaning that there is too much difference between the front and the back hems. The back needs to be shortened! You just need to put your mind around the fact that the back of that dress is just too long. Can you open the top of the facing and just turn the back wrong side out, then sew a new hem? That seems to me to be the easiest solution. Otherwise, cut it to tunic length, try it on and see how it feels and looks. If that doesn’t suit you, then you can shorten it again.

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  11. Those colours are so lovely on you. I am definitely guilty of the poor season matching – where the fabric itself is ok for the season but the colours aren’t!

    I would probably try a tunic length, I think that would make a great layering piece. Or hand it off to someone else! ๐Ÿ™‚

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    1. Sometimes transitional seasons are so hard! I feel like I always mess up at least one or two sewing projects when the weather changes, as I try to remember what the hell I wear in that new kind of weather! ๐Ÿ˜› How is your transition to summer sewing going?

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      1. Weeeellll…. I’m currently wearing a wool dress so… not so good! It;s been 19C all week which is probably not cold for you but for me qualifies as ‘very chilly’! We’ve been fluctuating between that and then a few days of 30+ so I haven’t needed more than the few summer things still in my wardrobe, and I’m just not feeling motivated to sew summer things. Although I did churn out a bunch of concords last weekend which is excellent for my transitional wardrobe.

        I definitely have that thing where I know with my thinking brain what clothes I wear in summer/winter, but sewing desires don’t… seem to connect to my thinking brain! XD It’s like trying to decide what I’ll want for dinner in three weeks. Too hard!

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  12. That fabric is great and I love the colors on you. I do think it might be cuter in a shorter length, maybe still with a high low hem? I could see it with th skinny pants or leggings, you could maybe throw a tee under my it when it was cold? Lots of possibilities…

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  13. Wow, I didn’t think I’d be so in the minority here but I don’t think there’s anything wrong with the hem length as is, for a winter dress. I hear it gets pretty cold where you live ๐Ÿ™‚ and so I think a longer dress, styled the way you have with tights, booties, etc., is exactly right. You’ll be happy for that extra length when the wind blows in January. Hahaha

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    1. You might be right! I’ve already busted out my ankle length down coat for yard duty, so i can wear pretty much anything under there and still be warm!

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