Tessuti Berlin Jackets

There must be something in the air, because I know of several sewing friends who all made this pattern recently!

Tessuti Berlin Coats

It’s the Tessuti Berlin Jacket, which is a cardigan/kimono style boxy shape. Tessuti is well-known for having several of these unlined modern jackets that are constructed with overlapping raw seams, instead of traditional right-sides-together seams. The examples I’ve seen made in boiled wool of heavier wools look transitional coats (not for proper winter, but for weather just above freezing). My two versions (yup, another one is below) are more like cardigans because I chose lighter fabric.

Tessuti Berlin Coats

The first thing I have to say is that I liked this pattern, but it’s not as unique as I expected. For this ponte version I just serged it together like a normal cardigan, and I think the end result looks a lot like many other patterns. If you already own the Paprika Opal, the Named Esme Maxi Cardigan, or any other boxy drop-sleeved cardigan, then  you don’t really need this pattern.

That said, it was fun to sew! I graded from a L at the shoulders to something slightly larger than the XL at the hips.  I wanted to fit to be boxy but not massively oversized, because I plan to wear this like a cardigan. Tessuti’s size range has always been a bit disappointing, but I’m happy that they have recently released two patterns in “plus sizes“, aka. size 18-22. On their website they say they’ll continue to release larger sized patterns.

Tessuti Berlin Coats

The star of the show here is this amazing jaquard double knit! It is a discount end from Fabricland, and came in two .7m cuts. That basically decided how long my jacket would be, although I did manage to extend things with some piecing in the collar and a banded hem for extra length. This fabric and pattern fit into my goal to dress more boldly – I felt good in it all day at work after taking these pictures!

Tessuti Berlin Coats

Here’s what the jacket looks like inside out – I thought it might help to show the style lines and construction! The wrong side of this jaquard is pretty amazing! In real life it’s a bit too green-gold to flatter my skin, but I like the flashes of colour when the jacket opens.

Speaking of fabric that is great on both sides… My first version was supposed to highlight this bonded scuba-and-grey-marl-knit fabric I also got at Fabricland this year.

Tessuti Berlin Coats

Royal blue is one of my favourite colours, and I really thought this was going to be awesome… but halfway through making it, I realised that the polyester sheen of the blue was never going to look luxe!

Tessuti Berlin Coats

I think all in all, the fabric is just a bit thin for this pattern, and so it drapes and hangs wrong. It’s not awful, but I don’t get a spring in my step when I put it on! I could undo a few seams and make the whole thing reversible, or make the grey side the “right” side… but I’m not sure that shapeless light grey will be any more successful.

Tessuti Berlin Coats

I did do the proper overlapping seams on this version though, and it was fun to try. I used chalk to draw a line on the wrong side of the fabric, and made sure the overlapping fabric lined up perfectly while I sewed. This made it all pretty easy, and it’s wasn’t as fiddly as I feared!

Tessuti Berlin Coats

So… could I count this as my #sewingdare from Caroline and Helen at Love To Sew to make a coat? I know it’s the very simplest version of outerwear, but I hope it *just* sneaks into the category!

Tessuti Berlin Coats

Whether or not these jackets get some wear or lots of wear, I’m happy to have sewn them! I used up stash fabric, tried a pattern I’ve wondered about for years, and had a fun couple of hours of sewing. (Update: I wore this all weekend as a sort of robe layer over pyjamas, and it was great!)

Have you sewn any any Tessuti patterns? I love the Isla top and the free Mandy Boat tee… I just bought the plus-size Eva dress, which is just weird enough that it might fit perfectly into my new bolder wardrobe. I find their patterns fascinating though – they are copies of hand drawn patterns, where you can actually see the marks of the pen. What do you think?


8 thoughts on “Tessuti Berlin Jackets

  1. Love your double knit version, and a flash of that reverse is just right – it looks so gorgeous in the close-up, but won’t show enough to put you off 🙂

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  2. I have just finished the Eva dress and it was really fun to make and I’m really happy with the dress. It’s a bit outside of my comfort zone but it definitely works for me and the next one is already in the planning. I agree this coat pattern doesn’t have much that’s unique but there are many Tessutti patterns I’d like to try now following my success with Eva.

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  3. I made a Mandy top because everyone is so obsessed with it. I like the finished product and neckline technique, but had to add width, length, and really, really expand the sleeves / armholes (they were so tiny!! why were they so tiny??) to get the boxy fit. Their other patterns don’t really call out to me personally, so I’ll just admire on other people!

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  4. I love your jackets. They have that perfect mix of chic and slouchy and look like you could really dress them up or down. The double knit that you used is absolutely stunning and I love that blue on you, but you are right the fabric weight makes a whole world of difference. I have never sewn a Tessuti pattern and have 100’s that I haven stitched up yet that are making me feel guilty. That is a nice touch with the copied hand-drawn patterns. 🙂 Xx

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  5. I’ll allow it….but only because you made two! LOL. These look great on you and I love your goal of dressing more boldly. I am woefully behind on my challenge to make a typical Vancouver outfit, but you know that Avery leggings are going to be the base! #leggingsaspantsforlife

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  6. Fun! That jacquard is fabulous. I know exactly which one the blue is, and i actually really like that group but I definitely think it reads as sporty rather than luxe—I think it would make a great little athletic shell, maybe even an anorak.

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